Background: WHO reported that 2.7% of women are active smokers in Indonesia. Smoking can decrease taste sensitivity. The objective of this study was to obtain the taste threshold, salivary secretion, blood pressure and blood glucose in smoking and non-smoking women.


Materials and Methods:  Subjects were 15 smoking women and 38 non-smoking women. The sweet and salt taste threshold was measured by dripping a solution of NaCl and glucose gradually starting from the lowest to the highest concentration. Blood glucose levels were measured using a glucometer device. Blood pressure was obtained by using a sphygmomanometer. Salivary volume is measured by spitting method. Salivary pH value was measured using pH paper test.


Results: The mean value of sweet taste threshold (0.04267 M), salt taste threshold (0.03267 M), salivary volume (2.78667 ml), blood glucose (112.83333 mg/dl) and systolic blood pressure (111.53333 mmHg) in smoking women were higher than the mean value of sweet taste threshold (0.03132 M), salt taste threshold (0.02513 M), salivary volume (2.73026 ml/5 min), blood glucose (107.36842 mg/dl) and systolic blood pressure (109.89474 mmHg) in non-smoking women. In contrast, the mean value of salivary pH (6.00) and diastolic blood pressure (73.46667mmHg) in smoking women were lower than the mean value of salivary pH (6.25) and diastolic blood pressure (76.18421 mmHg) in non-smoking women. There was a significant difference of sweet and salt taste threshold between smoking and non-smoking women (p<0.05).


Conclusion: Systolic blood pressure was the most contributing variable on explaining the difference in smoking and non-smoking women, followed by the sweet and salt taste threshold.