Objective: To compare the diagnostic ability of ultrasonography, contrast enhanced computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in detection of ovarian masses with histopathology correlation. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. The study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in northern India. Women with perimenopausal and postmenopausal aged>40 years were included in the study. It was planned to included 130 women considering the previous study. After complete clinical evaluation and laboratory investigations, the patients first underwent USG evaluation followed by CT and MRI assessment. Results: The mean age of patients was 56.70±11.81 years. USG was found to have the sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 96.5%. The PPV and NPV of USG for malignancy were 91.7% and 88.3% respectively. The accuracy of USG to differentiate between benign and malignant masses was 89.2%. CT was found to have the sensitivity of 79.5% and specificity of 93%. The PPV and NPV of CT for malignancy were 97.2% and 90.4% respectively. The accuracy of CT to differentiate between benign and malignant masses was 92.3%. MRI was found to have the sensitivity of 86.4% and specificity of 94.2%. The PPV and NPV of MRI for malignancy were 88.4% and 93.`% respectively. The accuracy of MRI to differentiate between benign and malignant masses was 91.5%. Conclusions: The findings of this study suggest that in a setting where MRI is available, it must be the diagnostic modality of choice.